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Sidney Dillon - Denver, Texas and Fort Worth Railroad Co. - Stock Certificate

Inv# AG1672   Stock
Sidney Dillon - Denver, Texas and Fort Worth Railroad Co. - Stock Certificate
State(s): Colorado
Texas
Years: 1886 or 1889

Stock signed by Sidney Dillon as president. Sidney Dillon (1812-1892) Railroad executive , born in Northampton, New York. He left his impoverished family farm at age seven to work as a water boy on railroad construction sites, and progressed to overseer and foreman.

One of America's premier railroad builders, Dillon began his career in the industry working as a water boy on the Mohawk and Hudson, one of America's earliest railroads. In 1840 his bid was accepted to build a small section of the Boston & Albany Railroad. This job launched his railroad career, which included becoming the major contractor for the Union Pacific Railroad. He was actively involved in the construction of numerous roads, his largest being the Union Pacific, with which he became actively involved in 1865 through a stock purchased in the Credit Mobilier.

As one of the principal contractors for the Union Pacific, Dillon's vast experience in the construction of railroads proved invaluable. He took part in the laying of the last rail in 1869 and received one of the ceremonial silver spikes used to complete the project. He served as director of the Union Pacific (1864–92) and twice as its president (1874–84, 1890–2). He wrote ‘Historic Moments: Driving the Last Spike of the Union Pacific’, published posthumously in Scribner's magazine (Aug 1892). Following 1870, Dillon was primarily known as a financier, becoming involved with Jay Gould in numerous ventures as well as serving on the board of directors of the Western Union Telegraph Co. Rare!

Sidney Dillon (May 7, 1812 – June 9, 1892) was an American railroad executive and one the nation's premier railroad builders.

Dillon was born in Northampton, Fulton County, New York. His father, Timothy, was a farmer.

Sidney Dillon began his career in the industry working as a water boy on the Mohawk and Hudson Railroad, one of America's earliest railroads, for its construction from Albany to Schenectady, New York.

In 1840, he went into business for himself, forming his own construction company, and obtaining the construction contract for the Boston and Albany Railroad.

He was actively involved in the construction of numerous roads, his largest being the Union Pacific Railroad, with which he became actively involved in 1865 through an equity exchange with the Crédit Mobilier of America corporation.

Crédit Mobilier of America was a company set up by the Union Pacific to defraud United States taxpayers in the construction of the First Transcontinental Railroad. The result was the Crédit Mobilier of America scandal, which exposed an over-invoicing and a stock and bond share-pricing scheme, whereby Union Pacific officers and directors, including Dillon, profited by manipulating the share price of Crédit Mobilier of America's stock shares and bonds, padding invoices to the U.S. Government, and bribing congressmen with shares in Crédit Mobilier of America, cash and other perks.

As one of the principal contractors for the Union Pacific, Dillon's vast experience in the construction of railroads proved invaluable. He took part in the "golden spike" ceremony of the First Transcontinental Railroad in 1869, receiving one of the ceremonial silver spikes used to complete the project. Following 1870, Dillon was primarily known as a financier, becoming involved with Jay Gould in numerous ventures as well as serving on the board of directors of the Western Union Telegraph Company. He finally served as President of the Union Pacific Railroad from 1874 to 1884, and again from 1890 until his death in 1892.

In 1841, Dillon married Hannah Smith (1822–1884) of Amherst, Massachusetts. The couple had two daughters:.

  • Cora A. Dillon, who married Dr. Peter B. Wyckoff in 1875.
  • Julia E. ("Julie") Dillon, who married Josiah Dwight Ripley on May 28, 1862. After his death, she married Gilman Smith Moulton on March 1, 1894.

Dillon died at his home at 23 West Fifty-Seventh Street in New York City, after a twelve-week illness, at the age of 80. Funeral services were held at the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church (55th Street and 5th Avenue) on June 13. He is interred under a distinctive Celtic cross at Woodlawn Cemetery in Bronx, New York.

Through his daughter Julia, he was the grandfather of Sidney Dillon Ripley I (1863–1905) and Louis Arthur Dillon Ripley (1878–1958), himself the father of Dillon's great-grandson Sidney Dillon Ripley II (1913–2001), a noted ornithologist, conservationist and Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution for twenty years.

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Condition: Excellent

A stock certificate is issued by businesses, usually companies. A stock is part of the permanent finance of a business. Normally, they are never repaid, and the investor can recover his/her money only by selling to another investor. Most stocks, or also called shares, earn dividends, at the business's discretion, depending on how well it has traded. A stockholder or shareholder is a part-owner of the business that issued the stock certificates.

Item ordered may not be exact piece shown. All original and authentic.
Price: $399.00